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Be Sweet to Your Heart

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Be sweet to your one and only, your heart, at Norman Regional’s healthy heart event. You can learn about heart disease and prevention from physicians as well as be screened for your risk of experiencing a heart attack. Light refreshments will be served. Activities include:

“Norman Regional is offering everyone who signs up for the Healthy Heart Fair a free lipid profile blood test.”
<p>Norman Regional is offering everyone who signs up for the Healthy Heart Fair a free lipid profile blood test.</p>
  • Free blood test results, blood pressures screenings and risk assessments
  • Health information on nutrition, recipes, fitness, tobacco cessation, food demonstration, heart risk assessments and more.
  • Physician Panel on prevention, heart disease, risk factors, treatments and recovery

Tuesday, February 23
5pm to 7pm

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm – Healthy Heart Fair

6:00 pm to 7:00 pm – Expert Panel

Norman Regional Hospital Education Center
901 N. Porter Ave.,
Norman, OK

Please RSVP 405.307.3176

Norman Regional is offering everyone who signs up for the Healthy Heart Fair a free lipid profile and A1C blood test. The blood test must be completed by Thursday, February 18th in order for the lab to send us your results in time for the event. Simply take this ad into any Norman Regional affiliated laboratory location during its normal business hours.

You must fast for 12-14 hours prior to this test.

Norman Regional Lab Locations:

Doctor's Park Building
500 E. Robinson St., Suite 1600, Norman

Findlay Medical Center
809 N. Findlay, Suite 101, Norman

Outpatient Diagnostic Services
901 N. Porter, Norman

HealthPlex Professional Building
3400 W. Tecumseh, Norman

HealthPlex Hospital Outpatient Services
3300 HealthPlex Pkwy, Norman

Norman Regional Moore Temporary Services
700 S. Telephone Rd., Moore

January – Thyroid Awareness Month

Friday, January 8, 2016

January is Thyroid Awareness Month and the perfect time to bring attention to thyroid disease. Many people know the term thyroid but do not know the important role it plays in keeping people active and healthy. The thyroid gland is essential in regulating the way our bodies function. All of the major organs require the appropriate amount of thyroid hormone in order to work properly. Disorders that result from a dysfunctional thyroid gland have been increasing in recent years.

“The thyroid is located below the Adam's apple at the base of the neck. It is a small gland that can be found in front of the windpipe and consists of two lobes resembling a butterfly.”
<p>The thyroid is located below the Adam's apple at the base of the neck. It is a small gland that can be found in front of the windpipe and consists of two lobes resembling a butterfly.</p>

What is the thyroid gland?
The thyroid is located below the Adam's apple at the base of the neck. It is a small gland that can be found in front of the windpipe and consists of two lobes resembling a butterfly. The thyroid produces several hormones that impact metabolism, growth and development and body temperature.

What problems can occur with the thyroid?
Problems exist when the thyroid gland produces an abnormal amount of thyroid hormones. An overproduction can cause hyperthyroidism while an insufficient amount can create a condition called hypothyroidism. It may be difficult to determine if the thyroid gland is working properly which causes many people to go undiagnosed. Disorders can vary from a small, harmless enlarged gland called a goiter, which does not require treatment, to advanced stage life-threatening cancer. Thyroid nodules can also develop. While anyone can suffer from a thyroid disorder, more women are affected than men and the risk will increase with age. At this time, there is no way to stop the onset of thyroid problems but early diagnosis and treatment can prevent it from becoming serious.

  • Hyperthyroidism is caused by an over production of thyroid hormones. People with hyperthyroidism can experience rapid weight loss, high blood pressure, have trouble sleeping and can battle anxiety issues. The following conditions can result.
    • Graves' Disease: An immune system disorder caused by the production of too much thyroid hormone. A sign of Graves’ disease is having bulging eyes.
    • Toxic Adenomas: A disorder caused by the growth of thyroid nodules that may secrete hormones.
    • Subacute Thyroiditis: An acute inflammatory disease that causes pain in the thyroid gland. Pain could be experienced in other parts of the neck, ears or jaw. This condition could last weeks or potentially for months.
  • Hypothyroidism is a result of an underactive thyroid which can negatively affect an individual’s energy level. Decreased heart rate, chronic fatigue, weight gain, depression and constipation are some of the symptoms that exist with this disorder. Listed below are some hypothyroid conditions.
    • Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: An autoimmune disorder that causes inflammation and slowly destroys the thyroid tissue. The damage can result in a thyroid hormone deficiency.
    • Central or Pituitary Hypothyroiditis: Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced by the pituitary gland. If there is a problem with the pituitary gland or hypothalamus, it could potentially cause hypothyroidism
    • Congenital Hypothyroidism: This is a pediatric condition where infants are born with a thyroid or enzyme dysfunction that will not allow a sufficient production of thyroid hormone. These infant are inactive, sleep for a lengthy time period and have a suppressed appetite.
  • Thyroid nodules are common and will be present most often in people without hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. Nodules are either felt during an exam or more likely discovered incidentally during another imaging procedure in the neck. They require investigation despite not being symptomatic. Based on the size of the nodules, a biopsy may be indicated to exclude the possibility of cancer.

There is good news. Once a person has been diagnosed, they can begin treatment. There are conventional treatments available.

  • For hyperthyroid conditions, medication, radioactive iodide treatment or surgery can be employed to reduce or halt the production of the thyroid hormone.
  • For hypothyroid conditions, medication cannot increase the production; therefore hormone replacement could be a solution.

According to Dr. Tom Connally, the Medical Director of the Norman Regional Health System Endocrine Surgery Program and a pioneer in the area of minimally-invasive thyroid and parathyroid surgeries, "It is important to discuss your options with a physician to determine the most effective method for you based on your situation, age, health and medical history. If you are going to require thyroid surgery, you should seek a high volume endocrine surgeon for best operative outcomes."

Healthy Holiday Habits

Monday, November 23, 2015

The holidays are here and we wonder what the scale will look like come January. This is a time for family and friends to enjoy each other's company as well as partake in some delicious, traditional meals. With some planning, we can make it through these office parties, social gatherings and family meals without too much over indulging.

“With some planning, we can make it through these office parties, social gatherings and family meals without too much over indulging.”
<p>With some planning, we can make it through these office parties, social gatherings and family meals without too much over indulging.</p>

According to Teresa Brown RN, MPH, RD/LD, CDE, of the Health and Wellness Center and Diabetes Program at Norman Regional Health System, here are some tips for a healthier holiday season.

  • Focus on the real purpose for the gathering. Socialize, catch up, meet new people and have fun. The food should be secondary.
  • Do not arrive on an empty stomach. We tend to skip meals to save our calories to splurge at the big evening event. Eat sensibly during the day. Arriving hungry could cause you to eat more than you planned and make some unhealthy choices. Considering eating a salad, a small sandwich, some nuts, or a piece of fruit or vegetables, it will help you make wiser choices at moments of weakness.
  • Window shop the food at the buffet table first. Before just jumping in with a plate and a serving spoon, make a healthy game plan for the type of food you will place on your plate. It is OK to treat yourself, just do it in moderation.
  • Bring a healthy option to the pot luck. If you are the one to bring a sensible dish, you know there will be something healthy that you like. You can even offer to bring a healthy dish to a friend's gathering even if he or she is providing the whole meal.
  • Small portions and slow eating is the key. If we rush through our meals, are we even enjoying and savoring the wonderful flavors? It takes our brains about 20 minutes to realize that we are full. You can avoid that uncomfortable, overstuffed feeling by eating slowly.
  • No lingering. When you are finished with your meal/snack, it is time to step away from the dining table or the buffet area.
  • Walk the walk. Drive passed the parking spots closest to the entrance door. Park further away to increase the number of steps you take. We need to find any opportunities to move more a little more throughout our day.

November - National Lung Cancer Awareness Month

Monday, November 9, 2015

November is National Lung Cancer Awareness month. Lung cancer is the 2nd most common diagnosed cancer for men and women, but it is the leading cause of cancer deaths. In 2015 alone, there were 221,200 new newly diagnosed cases of lung cancer in the United States. However, if lung cancer is caught early, treatment can help people live a more productive and healthier life. More than 430,000 people alive today have been diagnosed with lung cancer at some point.

“Lung cancer is the 2nd most common diagnosed cancer for men and women, but it is the leading cause of cancer deaths.”
<p>Lung cancer is the 2nd most common diagnosed cancer for men and women, but it is the leading cause of cancer deaths.</p>

Risk of having a diagnosis of lung cancer can be reduced. Use of tobacco products is the largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in our country and contributes greatly to the risk of developing lung cancer. 80% of the lung cancer deaths are believed to have been caused by smoking. Changing behaviors related to tobacco use can increase chances of avoiding lung cancer, or surviving longer with a diagnosis of lung cancer.

The Great American Smoke-out is an annual event held on the 3rd Thursday every November. This year it will be held on November 19th. We encourage people who smoke to say “no” to use of tobacco products (for at least one day) on that day. Millions of Americans continue to smoke cigarettes, but many would like to stop. The good news: it is possible to stop smoking! NRHS can help provide you with the tools to quit. The desire to be free of tobacco is the first step toward change. Get support for the next steps to quitting by enrolling in our QuitSmart program. For more information about Quit Smart , please call (405) 307-3175.

The Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline is another avenue to receive help. Primarily funded by the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, or TSET, this hotline is a toll-free support line with an enhanced selection of services. You can receive free text and email support, phone and web coaching, patches, gum, lozenges and more. Please call 1-800-QUIT NOW or visit OKhelpline.com to register and receive nonjudgmental support from specially trained Quit Coaches who can help provide services tailored just for you.

The old saying that quitters never win is not always true. People who quit using tobacco products are winners. You can do it!

World Diabetes Day is November 14, 2015

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

By 2035, it is estimated there will be 592 million people diagnosed with Diabetes – an increase over 50% from the amount of cases today. This number is astonishing. We need to act today to CHANGE TOMORROW!!! 70% of the type 2 diabetes cases can be prevented with simple lifestyle changes.

“Diabetes is major cause of heart disease and stroke. According to the CDC, the risk for stroke is 2 to 4 times higher among people with diabetes.”
<p>Diabetes is major cause of heart disease and stroke. According to the CDC, the risk for stroke is 2 to 4 times higher among people with diabetes.</p>

World Diabetes Day is November 14, 2015. The theme is Living Healthy and Diabetes with a goal to increase education so we can prevent, reduce or manage diabetes.

There are three types of Diabetes.

  • A person with Type 1 diabetes is dependent on having insulin hormone injections to provide what the body cannot produce. Without insulin, blood glucose levels increase which could cause serious organ damage. A healthy lifestyle can help manage type 1 diabetes.
  • A person diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes is faced with high blood pressure and their body produces less insulin. Type 2 diabetes is preventable and caused by our unhealthy and sedentary lifestyles.
  • Some pregnant women may develop gestational diabetes when they are not able to produce enough insulin throughout their pregnancy. While gestational diabetes can go away after pregnancy, these women have higher changes of developing type 2 diabetes later on in life.

Diabetes is major cause of heart disease and stroke. According to the CDC, the risk for stroke is 2 to 4 times higher among people with diabetes. Diabetes is also the leading cause of kidney failure, non-traumatic lower limb amputations, and new cases of blindness among adults in the United States.

Risk factors

  • Obesity
  • Inactive lifestyle
  • Unhealthy diet
  • Glucose Intolerance

Warning Signs

  • Fatigue
  • Increased thirst
  • Weight Loss
  • Blurred Vision
  • Lack of concentration

Diabetes is not something you can simply outgrow. However through education and making lifestyle changes, you can reduce and manage it better.

What can you do today to change tomorrow? It starts with a healthy overall lifestyle.

  • Choose whole grains and avoid processed foods
  • Avoid sugars
  • Become more active – start out walking and slowly increase your activity and exercise

Norman Regional Health System is ready to help you. We have one of the Oklahoma’s only Diabetes Centers. Pre-diabetes education is so important. For people who have not developed type 2 diabetes but are showing the warning signs, we offer an evidence-based National Diabetes Prevention Program, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Through trained lifestyle coaches, the program will teach you how to change your lifestyle to prevent type 2 diabetes. For more information, please contact NRHS Health and Wellness Center at 405-307-5733.