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Make Your Home a Safer Place to Live

A television set. A throw rug. Playing outside while Dad mows the grass. These everday things can actually lead to accidents and even death.

Some of the most common items found in homes can be dangerous to both children and adults if proper precautions aren’t taken. June is National Home Safety Month. During this time take a few minutes to protect your family by making your home a safer place, urges EMSStat manager and paramedic Eddie Sims.

Child Safety at Home

While parents may know the traditional ways to child-proof their home, there are also many hidden dangers. Sims says paramedics have seen children who have been crushed by large items such as televisions. Parents should make sure large, top-heavy items are always secured to a wall or not placed on small furniture that could topple.

“We only see a couple of these cases a year, but it’s easily preventable,” Sims said.

Another danger for children that might not even cross a parent’s mind is being outdoors during the lawn mowing process. Sims said children under 10 should never be outside while the yard is being mowed.

“Tragedies happen every year when kids get on or around riding lawn mowers,” Sims said. “They can become trapped under the machine and these accidents are almost always fatal.”

Paramedics have also seen feet severed from push lawnmowers and items fly into the air and injure bystanders.

Adults Should Take Precautions As Well

Adults can also be easily injured while at home. In fact, according to the Home Safety Council the most common home accident is falling. Make sure not to place rugs at the bottom and tops of stairs, and keep stairs and pathways free from clutter.

“The biggest causes of falls we see are throw rugs and water spilled on the floor,” Sims said.

During the hot summer months, people should also be sure to stay hydrated and drink plenty of water throughout the day.

“If you feel thirsty, you’ve waited too long to drink something,” Sims said.

Calling 911

One of the most important messages EMSStat paramedics wish to tell the public is to not hesitate to call emergency services. Sims urges people to call 9-1-1 if they think they need help or have had an accident at home.

“We’d much rather go out when we’re not needed, then not go out when we are needed,” he said.

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For More Information

Contact Kelly Wells
Norman Regional Health System

Office (405) 307.2143
Fax (405) 307.2144
Email NRHS_Corporate_Communications@nrh-ok.com